Friday, March 24, 2017

Cinema Advertising Stands Strong

Cinema advertising is often overlooked by many marketing departments and booted from their media mix. Video Advertising Bureau released some data that might make marketing managers change their minds about the big screen.

According to VAB, box office ticket sales saw an eleven percent increase from 2014 to 2016. Perhaps this is due to the rising median household income amounts. From 2010 to 2015, the median HHI has increased from $53,569 to $56,516. With an increase in HHI comes an increase in disposable income which has grown from $11,515 in 2010 to $14,281 in 2016 (referring to personal disposable income).

Demographically, heavy movie goers tend to be young, multicultural, affluent, educated, and professional. The majority of these people are ages 18-44, employed, home-owners, college educated, and making over $50k per year.

So, what’s so special about cinema advertising? Well, beyond the fact that you’re speaking to a captive, engaged, willing audience; cinema advertising drives consumer action. Many steady cinema advertisers like Vans, Shazam, esurance, LG, Infiniti, and Hotels.com see an increase in website activity when cinema is a part of their media mix verses when they’re not on the big screen.

On top of that, consumers are choosing to spend leisure time watching movies at a theater more often than other activities like attending a sporting event, going to the zoo, or having a picnic.




It might be time to rethink that marketing mix and see how your brand on the big screen can make a difference.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Dominate Digital Forces Look to Continue Their Growth


As eMarketer projects digital ad spend/revenue for the next few years, Facebook and Google look to hold onto their top ranks. Ad spend in the United States looks to grow by 15.9% equaling $83 billion in revenue. Both Facebook and Google look to increase their ad share percentages by 32.1 percent and 14.8 percent respectively.

Overall, Google wins the gold by owning 40.7 percent of the US digital ad market with Facebook settling for silver with 19.7 percent. However, when that’s broken down by search and display the tables turn just a bit.

Google still takes home the prize when it comes to search with an estimated $28.5 billion in ad revenue for 2017 (77.8%), but Facebook comes in on top when we’re talking about display. Facebook brings in $16.3 billion in US digital display ad dollars making up 39.1 percent of the market. Both Google’s search and Facebook’s display revenues are expected to continue growing through 2019.

When looking at mobile, the two digital powerhouses combined accumulate for 57 percent of mobile spend with Google acquiring 32.4 percent and Facebook earning 24.6 percent.

The below chart shows multiple digital providers and their ad share percentage projections through 2019 while focusing specifically on digital mobile ad revenue.


Snap Inc., the inventors of Snapchat, is expected to see the most dramatic increase over the next few years. However, their share is still small and far from the dominating digital forces.


Other platforms like Twitter, Yahoo, and Yellow Pages are expected to decline in the near future. 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Making the Most of Email Marketing

Email marketing – when executed correctly – can be a huge success for any marketing campaign. Seamas Egan, Associate Director of Revenue Operations at Campaigner, digs into the art of email and provides three tips to making the most of your email marketing.

1.     Subject line
Subject lines of an email provide a teaser to the recipient and is ultimately what makes them decide to open or delete your email. In fact, thirty-three percent of recipients report the subject line to be the only factor in deciding whether they will open a marketing email or not. Subject lines should be personalized with either the recipient’s name or the words “you” or “your” to establish a personal connection. Numbers can also be used to help your subject line stand out and create a sense of urgency. Subject lines should also be under 30 characters as sixty-six percent of emails in today’s society are opened via mobile device.

2.     Past purchasers
Segment your email lists based on purchase behavior and target specifically those who have converted with your business on prior occasions. This information will help you send emails that are not only personalized, but directly targeted at the recipient’s interests.

3.     Frequency
Just remember the Goldilocks and the Three Bears – too hot… too cold… just right! You don’t want to annoy your customers with too many marketing emails, but you also don’t want them to forget your brand. It’s important to strike the right balance to keep your product at the top of customers’ minds while not overwhelming them. A good way to test your frequency is by some A/B testing; compare separate emails lists with different frequency levels to discover a happy medium.


When email marketing is done right, it’s a huge success. In fact, 91% of Americans say they like receiving marketing emails. Consumers frequently complain about marketing and how advertisements “obstructs their task”, but in the email space, marketing is actually welcomed. 

Friday, March 3, 2017

Back to Basics with Generation Z

As Generation Z grows into young adults who hold a little bit of spending power, marketers are eager to see how their path to purchase compares to the generations preceding them. Since Gen Z is technology savvy, one would assume that their behavior would revolve around the digital world.

However, a study conducted by Accenture shows something a little different.

Older Gen Z consumers (ages 18-20) actually prefer purchasing at physical brick and mortar locations. In fact, 77% of older Gen Z consumers would rather purchase in-store.
When compared with Millennials, Gen Z shoppers lead the way with in-store and mobile shopping while Millennials still lead when it comes to desktop and tablet.


The difference being, Generation Z consumers are influenced greatly by social media on what to purchase. In fact, 72% of US Gen Z survey participants said they want to make purchases directly from social media. Half of the participants said that social media inspires them to purchase products, and one third of respondents have increased their use of social platforms specifically to inform their decision-making within the past year; as shown by the chart below.



Going beyond social media, Gen Z consumers are open to developing shopping methods like voice-activated ordering (45%), curated subscriptions (77%), and automatic replenishment (66%). 


Jill Standish, senior managing director at Accenture, says, “I think the key takeaway for marketers is you have to be listening in social media. You’ve got to be there, and you’ve got to be inspiring.”

Thursday, February 23, 2017

The Back and Forth of Marketing Strategies

When I was a kid, my favorite piece of equipment on the playground was the teeter-totter. My goal was always to find someone who could balance the scale so that we would both be elevated a foot or two above the ground. In an interesting way, the world of marketing mirrors that playground activity.

Andy Sippel writes an article for AdWeek titled, “Reach is the New Black: Advertising’s Mass Reawakening”. Sippel looks at two sides of marketing: mass reach and precise niche targeting of specific people.

While specifically targeting the single soccer mom with two kids aged 7-10 who brings in $80k per year in the Kansas City DMA might sound perfect for your advertising plan, it shouldn’t be the only strategy for your campaign. In fact, Procter & Gamble CMO, Marc Pritchard, announced that his brands “were stagnant due to targeting too narrowly on Facebook”.

Big picture being: throwing all your eggs in one basket won’t work. Advertising doesn’t flourish as we would like when it’s limited to one medium. Sippel reports that, “in 2011, there was nearly a 100-point difference in net ‘plan to spend’ optimism between the highest and lowest media” however, advertisers are seeing the flaw in that thinking and, “last year, the difference compressed to only 42 points.”

Along those lines, the digital world is unable to form a regular audience build comparable to that of television or even radio. When people routinely tune-in to their favorite programs, a loyal audience forms amongst viewers that is unique to the delivery method of your ad.

Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) recommends three “smart-spending action steps” for advertisers who might find themselves stuck on the uneven teeter-totter.

1.      Invest in multiple platforms rather than shifting money from one to the next
2.      Add traditional media to your digital investments to maximum ROI
3.      Spend to reach millennials on traditional and new media – and not just mobile

ARF even recommends spending roughly 71-78% of budget on traditional media and 22-29% on digital (based on a $15 million budget).


So, don’t get caught on the high or low end of the advertising teeter-totter; instead, return to the media mix and reach your audience in more ways than one. The more roads your deliver your message on, the more your brand will succeed. 

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Gen X Surpass Millennials in Social Media Usage


Surprisingly enough, Millennials are not the strongest social media users of the bunch. That’s right, according to Nielsen; Generation X (ages 35-49) spends the most time on social media at nearly 7 hours per week.

Millennials do fall in second place with over 6 hours on social media weekly. Across gender lines, females spend 25% of online time on social media while men only reach the 19% mark.


Sean Casey, President of Nielsen Social states that 39% of heavy social users believe that finding out about products and services is an important reason for using social networks.

Thirty-five percent of heavy social users say that special discounts are important and 29% say supporting their favorite brands or companies is important.
On top of that, women are likely to interact with social and television simultaneously. 

Sixty-one percent of unique Facebook users who discuss television on the social network are female.


Generation X females may be the best people to target with a mix of television and social. 

Friday, February 10, 2017

New Emotions Brought to Marketing in 2017

What’s one thing that the recent election, inauguration, and Super Bowl all have in common? Empathy. That’s right; all three events have given the people of the United States a feeling of empathy or a desiring to receive empathy. But how are they connected exactly?

Kevin McKeon puts it this way, “The election fueled it, the inauguration sealed it, and the Super Bowl was its first big state, offering a $5 million shot to put your brand’s empathy on display for all America to see and admire.” Sure enough, the Super Bowl hosted many more politically driven commercials than in previous years. Brands took a stance on today’s hot topics and let their opinions be known thus kicking off the newest trend in marketing for 2017: empathy.

Empathy is defined as: the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.

McKeon, author of the article, “A Brand’s Guide to Empathy: Marketing’s Latest Buzzword”, gives advice to advertisers as they strive to be empathetic in order to win customers for their brand.

You don’t own empathy
That’s right, empathy isn’t something you have; it’s something you give. Empathy isn’t about you; it’s about the person you’re relating to. In a business worldview, empathy isn’t about your company or how great you are, it’s about the customer feeling understood and welcomed.

Empathy isn’t just something you feel – it’s something you do
While empathy may begin as a feeling, it has the ability to grow into action. Businesses have the resources to make action out of feeling. Let empathy be shown through your company’s deeds.

Think like people, not like marketers
Why would people care? Would people want this? How is this delivering real value? If I were in their shoes, would I buy it? Think like people who are in search of something, not like marketers trying to sell something. Understand what people want and provide that for them.

Empathy should also be fun
Let’s face it; Super Bowl 51 lacked some “laugh until your stomach hurts” commercials. But empathy and humor don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Ikea (Sweden) reminds the world that life should be fun and provide laughter with their “Retail Therapy” campaign. They’ve got a whole website (ikearetailtherapy.com) filled with products renamed to match Google search results regarding relationships in Sweden. Some of my favorites being a mattress wedge titled, “She Doesn’t Want to Cuddle”, a floor length mirror called, “World’s Most Beautiful People List”, and a pair of scissors named, “My Son Plays Too Much Computer Games”.

Empathy isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution
Remember your audience, your brand, and your message.


While 2017 may be the year of empathy, remember that your customer is the most important part of the equation.